Sunday Homestead Update – Spring Busy, But Calm

It has been a nice, calm, uneventful week here at WCF.  Just what we needed after several weeks of crazy.  We got some warm days and some rain – both good for our gardens full of new seeds and seedlings.

Garden Progress Update

We have done a lot of planting, hardening off of plants, transplanting, filling wall-o-waters, and general gardening this week.

Medicinal Herb Garden- The medicinal herbs are the last things to come up here, due to the cold climate.  So not much is happening in this garden.  The chives are up, as is the rhubarb.  The yarrow is just starting up.  The apple trees and the lilac bush are just barely starting to form leaf buds.

Garlic/Onion Patch- This year this is actually the garlic/potato patch, and I have spread the onions here and there and everywhere in my other gardens for pest control.  The Northern White garlic are up and going strong, the Spanish Roja are sparse and a bit behind, but this is what happened last year too and the Spanish Roja produced fine by the end of the season.  The potatoes are in the ground.

Upper Vegetable Garden- We have the tents and the Wall-O-Waters up to extend our season and get some plants in the ground early.  Our last frost of the season is still a ways away, and these make it so we can actually grow something in our short, 10-week frost to frost season.

We have tomatoes, squash, and peppers in the WOWs.  And there are cabbage seedlings in the tents, along with lettuce, spinach, kale, radish, and beet seeds in the ground.  The carrots and pea seeds are also in the ground.  We should have some tiny sprouts coming up all over very soon.

Strawberry Patch and Strawberry Terrace- The old strawberry patch is coming up nicely.  We finished the strawberry terrace and were only planting one level this year because we only had enough compost and soil for one level.  We were unable to find much in the way of plants at the garden centers around our area (coronavirus has everyone planting gardens), so I couldn’t find any new strawberries to put in that one level.  Then I decided to change the landscaping of the front edge of the existing patch.  It previously had a little wire decorative fence and some 2-inch thick bricks between it and the path.  This caused the strawberries to spill out onto the path, and the little fence was faded an breaking after only a couple of years of use.  I decided to use thicker bricks to hold it back better.  In the process of changing out, there were many strawberry plants crowded up at the front of the patch that needed to come out.  Most years I try to cut all the runners, but a few times in the last few years I was too busy in the fall with Mr. Smiles’ surgeries and hospitalizations to get around to cutting runners.  So the strawberries had run rampant and were overcrowded all along the front edge.  As I worked to take out the crowded berry plants I was shocked to find that after only being 1/4 of the way across the front I had filled the one terrace box I wanted to fill.  So then I put compost and dirt into the second terrace, and by halfway across the front of the patch I had filled the second terrace box.

The third terrace still needs more construction on it, so Little Miss and Braveheart found an area around the chicken coop where they wanted to make their own strawberry patch.  So they built that with some decorative bricks, and by 3/4 of the way across the patch I had filled their patch with berry plants.  I had no idea that my strawberries had gotten SO crowded!!!

The last 1/4 of the front edge gave me 15 plants, and I was out of space, so I was able to share that with a friend who gardens as well.  What a blessing!  Here I was trying to buy new plants, when I had plenty at my disposal.  Technically, the books suggest you don’t do what I did due to pests and disease, but thankfully, here in the high Rockies, pests and disease are not as big of an issue as other places due to our dry climate, and the fact that we get so very cold in the winter.  I think this will work fine and the strawberries will produce much better now that they have more space.  Now I just need to thin out the rest of the patch a little bit.  The front was definitely the worst, because it gets more sun, so they were reaching for it.  But the rest of the patch could use some help too.

Berry Bushes and Grape Vines- The grape vines are always late to get going due to the cold, so nothing is happening with them yet.  But the Gooseberry bushes and the Currant bushes are covered with leaves.  One Gooseberry bush has some flowers on it too.  We planted the new Gooseberry bush that was eaten by worms, and it looks like it is going to recover pretty well.  We also planted the Black Currant bush that surprised us earlier this year.  It has not been as happy with its transplant as the Gooseberry is, and we decided to put a Wall-o-water around it to help boost it along.

Lower Vegetable Garden- It is fun to begin to use our new vegetable garden, even if it is only 2/3 built.  Next year we will have the whole thing finished.  We have tomatoes in the WOWs, as well as lettuce, spinach, kale, radish, and beet seeds in the tents.  And carrot and pea seeds are in the ground as well.  Watching for the little seedlings to pop up!

Home Dairy

This week our aged cheddar was 5 months old.  We at half of it at 3 months, and then put the other half back in the cheese cave to try again at 5 months and 7 months.  This week we tried the 1/4 that has been aging for 5 months.

The flavor was excellent!  Better than the 3 month for sure.  So I think we will try to age all our cheddar to at least 5 months.  We will see in a couple of months what 7 months tastes like.

Now that we are getting plenty of raw milk, we have started making more and more of our homemade dairy products again.  Twice a week I am making a quart of sheep’s milk yogurt.  I am really enjoying how much easier my instant pot is for yogurt-making.  This week we also made some Paneer.  Paneer is an Indian cheese, and Sunshine has been trying out all sorts of Indian recipes lately and requested that we make her some.  I am planning to make some aged cheese this coming week, as well as Chevre now that we can drink the goat’s milk (because we had to assist with her birth she had to have an antibiotic shot, so we had to wait a week before we could drink the milk).

Sheep/Goats/Chickens

All the mothers and babies are doing well.  We are all enjoying the cuteness of the lambs and kid playing together – who needs TV when you have a barnyard full of fun?  The chickens are still not very thrilled with the new additions, especially Misty, who chases them constantly.  But they are settling in to the new situation.

We were gifted an old feeder that we are trying out for the sheep and goats, it seems like it is going to work very well.  As you can see, Pansy the goat can be quite pushy and in this photo has a whole side to herself, but Fiona the sheep is dominant over her, so Fiona keeps everyone moving around the feeder and makes her share.

We have been making a lot of breeding program decisions this week, now that all but one sheep have lambed.  Autumn and Twilight have been sold and left for their new home.  Remi has also been sold and will go to the same place as them, but not for a few more weeks.  Daisy and Misty will likely be for sale, and we have some people interested in them already, but we will not be making those final decisions until Maggie gives birth and we are closer to weaning all the lambs.  We did buy a new ram from out of state, and he will be arriving next week.  Fiona, Blue, and Nora are all guaranteed to stay here for breeding.  Time will tell who else will stay.

The two sets of baby chicks are growing well.  Our old broody hen, Eve, has decided to set again, so we gave her hatching eggs this morning and should have some more chicks in a few weeks.

Busy spring on the farm!

Sunday Homestead Update – a Full Homesteading Mom Life

I live a full life.  At times, it feels totally overwhelming and I have to stop myself and take a breath and just realize how blessed I am to have such a full life.  A life full of love, relationships, fun, noise, messes, craziness, (occasional) quiet moments, losses, success, failure, a never-ending list of things to do and get done, dishes, laundry, and more dishes…and so much more.  This week I actually found myself changing a diaper with one hand, while holding a baby chick in the other, and, as if that wasn’t challenge enough, my phone rang and it was an important call that I needed to take and could not ignore.  I just burst out laughing, looking at myself in this crazy situation.  Obviously there is a story there, but it is too long for me to get into why I was changing a diaper while holding a baby chick, but it was indeed a necessary situation and I didn’t have another choice in the moment.  Nonetheless, I am spending this Mother’s Day being loved on by the ones I love the most, and feeling thankful for all the crazy homesteading Mom moments that I am blessed to experience each day – even the ones that make me want to scream.  🙂

Happy Mother’s Day to all you mothers out there!  I hope you can feel thankful for all the crazy mom-ing in your lives too.

Our farm is currently overflowing with animal mothers and babies.  Spring in the Rockies!

Chickens

Our batch of purchased chicks arrived this week.  These are the chicks that we originally ordered to be delivered during our hatch in January so we could brood them together.  There was a mix-up at the hatchery and they printed our shipping label, but didn’t ship our chicks.  Since we already had our own newly hatched chicks in the brooder, we decided not to have them re-ship the next week.  Instead, we waited until we were ready to do another brooding…which is this week.

There were 16 of them, and 3 died right after arrival, the rest are doing well.

Goat

Pansy was due to kid on April 27th.  She finally kidded this week, 9 days late.  It was a complicated delivery, but both mom and doeling are alive.  And the doeling, named Pearl, is oh-so-cute.  I will share more about it later this week.

Sheep

We have a barnyard full of ewes and lambs.  Blue lambed this week, leaving us with just one pregnant ewe left for this season (Maggie).  Everyone is growing well, the lambs are playing and romping together, and the mamas seem happy to not be so very huge and pregnant any longer.  Maggie is not due until mid-june, so we have a break from birthing here for awhile.

Blue’s little girl got a name, finally.  It took us awhile – I think the spring lambing/kidding season sleep-deprivation added to the delay.  But she is now known as Misty.  She is almost 1 week old now.

Daisy has continued to become more bonded to little Nora, she is turning into a good mom.  I believe that she will be a fine mother in the future, and that the traumatic birth is the cause of these issues.  We are just so glad that we didn’t have to bottle feed her.  Nora is almost 2 weeks old now.

Blizzard is a ball of energy.  He is always wanting to play and run and head butt with the other lambs.  Typical boy.  He also has decided that the LGD is his BFF, which is cute.  We constantly find them cuddled together, or if Anya is running around, Blizzard will be running right behind her.  Fiona is the attentive, but also laid-back, experienced mom of the group, and seems happy to let Anya (the LGD) babysit for her.

Blizzard is 3 1/2 weeks old now.

Twilight is the oldest lamb, and that lends itself to her being kind of a bully to the others.  She is so much bigger than the new babies and she uses it to her advantage, pushing them around when she can get away with it.  But she is a beautiful ewe lamb and nice with the humans.  She is 5 weeks old now.

We are working on weaning all the babies to a 12-hours-off, 12-hours-on milk-sharing schedule.  Twilight and Nora are already there, and we are getting the younger ones there as well in the next couple of weeks.  It is nice to have so much milk now that they are getting older and we can take a good share of it.  We are making dairy products in the kitchen and really enjoying it.

Gardens

It is crazy to me that we are already putting seeds and seedlings outside.  This week has been full of planting and gardening.  Time is flying by me this spring!

Sunday Homestead Update – Need. Sleep. Please.

It has been a loooong week.  We are so exhausted.  The first few days of the week Mr. Smiles was having some medical issues and was waking up multiple times a night, crying, plus the every 3-hour birthing checks out to the barn.  Of course, the birthing check times did not line up with when Mr. Smiles was up, which resulted in very little sleep at all for a few days.  Then Daisy had her traumatic birth experience and the lamb rejection, so we didn’t really sleep at all that night.  Then we were back to 3-hour birthing checks every night since Blue and Pansy are both showing signs of birthing any minute, and especially since Blue is a first-time-mom we don’t want to risk another Daisy scenario.  We are so tired.  But we still love this homestead life!  Birthing season is just an exhausting time.

In addition to no sleep and all the birthings going on, we have had a VERY productive week with projects around the homestead and gardening.  Young Man goes back to work next week, but finished school last week.  So this week was a perfect opportunity to utilize his help with a lot of projects around here that Mtn Man doesn’t have time to get to, but that I need some extra muscles for.  So all the kids and I worked on stuff each day, and Mtn Man joined us all in the evenings after dinner while we still had some light.  One of our family’s favorite things to do is work on homestead project together, so it was a nice time of family togetherness all week.

Gardens

The new Lower Veggie Garden is done – we finished the gate, and it now has a functioning irrigation system.  The pea trellises are up and the hoop tents as well.  The Upper Veggie Garden has the irrigation system all set up for the year and we tested it.  We had to fix a couple burst pipe elbows – they always seem to keep some water in them and get frozen.  We got the pea trellises and the hoop tents up in that garden as well.  The Medicinal Herb Garden got new irrigation hoses all set up in it and tested out.  Then we planted our first seeds out in those gardens.  Peas, lettuce, spinach, and kale are all now in the ground!

The garlic is coming up, so we took the over-wintering straw off of it, got the irrigation lines laid out, and watered it.  And then planted the onions as well.

The Strawberry Patch has green leaves appearing all over, so we raked it out and cleaned out the dead stuff from last year.

We finished building the new Strawberry Terrace.  We will only be planting one level of it this year, and we will start hardening off and getting the strawberries planted this week.  The other two levels will be filled and planted next year.

 

The plants that over-winter in the ground are all starting to peek their heads up.  The chives are going strong and we have been using them a lot, and the rhubarb is getting almost ready for first harvest.  There is sage, oregano, and parsley that I didn’t bed-over for the winter and yet they survived and are all starting to get some green leaves on.  And the comfrey is just starting to put out some leaves.

Chickens

It was a big week for chicken butchering and shuffling.  We trap-nested and figured out how the adult hens were doing as far as laying goes.  A few were older and haven’t been laying at all through both of our last trap nestings, so they were butchered.  Plus we had the 4 cockerels from the January hatch to butcher as well.  I used my new Instant Pot to make broth from all the carcasses.  It turned out great!

Then we moved the pullets from the January hatch up and integrated them with the adult flock.

One of our very old hens, Clover, who had become a pet hen over the years, died this week from old age.  Since most of our chickens are livestock, not pets, this was the first time we had a bird die of old age.  We will miss her, she was a very pretty splash hen with a muff/beard and was always very sweet and friendly.

Sheep

The sheep are doing well.  We are continuing to work on integrating Daisy and Nora back into the flock, since Daisy is not protecting Nora and Autumn is being very aggressive.  Hopefully they will all settle in together soon.

The babies continue to give us hours of adorable play to watch.  Who needs TV when you are homesteading?

Nora is obsessed with the chickens.  The feeling is not mutual.

Blue is due late this week, though her ligaments have softened and she is looking like she will go early, like Daisy did.

Goat

Poor Pansy is now a week overdue.  Not sure what is going on.  Messed up dates?  We continue to wait and hope the babies come soon and healthy.  Pansy seems very miserably uncomfortable.

Between Blue and Pansy it is lining up to be a busy birthing week this week.  Can’t wait to see what they have!

Daisy’s Lambing – 2020 – Part 2

Read Part 1 about Daisy’s lambing by clicking here.

After we got Daisy and her lamb in a jug (small birthing/bonding stall), we took turns sitting up in the barn keeping an eye on them both and making Daisy stand still and let the baby nurse when she wanted to nurse.  After we got the children settled in for the night, Mtn Man and I were up there together trying to formulate a plan.

Daisy was acting very confused.  One minute she would be licking the baby and nickering to her.  Then she would turn away from the baby, take a few bites of food, and when she turned back around she would act like she had never seen the baby before in her life.  She would act surprised and check her out as if it was her first time ever seeing her.  It was like watching Dory on the movie Finding Nemo.  As this continued, she began to get irritated with the baby and tried to head-butt her.  We decided to give her another shot of oxytocin, because the vet said that might help if she was continuing to reject the lamb.  It didn’t help and at one point she went after her very aggressively, slamming her into the wall.  This had us very concerned.  We tried rubbing some molasses water on the lamb, which Daisy then licked off, but it didn’t do much for bonding at all.  We decided that it wasn’t safe to leave baby with her unattended over night.

We got a small metal crate and put the baby in it, in the jug with Daisy.  We planned to come up every 2 hours and let the baby out and hold Daisy still so the baby could nurse, and then put her back in the crate for safety between feedings.  When we put the baby in the crate, the baby started calling out, and Daisy got very upset and went to the crate and wanted her out.  She almost flipped it over in her attempts to get to the lamb, so we decided that would not work.  When we let the baby out she talked to it and licked it and seemed happy to have it back.  But then a few minutes later she was head-butting it again.  It was very frustrating.  So we decided to take turns staying with them preventing injury and holding Daisy for nursing.  I started the first shift, but then they both laid down and slept for an hour.  When the baby laid down, Daisy chose to lay near enough to reach out her head to sniff and lick her.  So we decided that as long as they were down and sleeping they were pretty safe, and we desperately needed sleep ourselves.  Plan shift…again.  The new plan was to go to the barn hourly, let baby nurse, prevent attacks, and once they settled back down to sleep we would come back to the house, sleep for an hour, repeat.  It worked pretty well.  But by morning Daisy was still going back and forth between attacking the baby and then wanting her.

Being that this was our first-ever rejected lamb, we called on people with more experience to give us advice.  Ultimately, after hearing the advice, we decided we should just bottle-feed the lamb.  So we took Daisy to the stanchion, milked her, and put her back in with the flock.  The lamb was crying, but she didn’t seem concerned.  We left the lamb in the jug in a way that the other animals in the barnyard could come meet her through the fence and visit her.  So when the other sheep and the LGD heard her crying they came to check out what was going on.  When Daisy saw the other sheep and the dog interested in her lamb she all of a sudden became frantic and wanted back in with her lamb.  Jealousy?  She just needed to feel a little jealousy?  Or protectiveness?  Not sure, but we decided to go with it, and we put her back in with the lamb.

The family, again, took turns watching them for the rest of the day.  She did not head-butt her anymore, and she allowed her to nurse without anyone having to hold her still.  She wasn’t very strongly bonded to her, but at least she was willing to feed her and not hurt her.

The next day was the same, so, late that day, we decided to let them out for a little while to play in the barnyard and get some fresh air and sunshine – with us overseeing it all.

Daisy was definitely not protective of the lamb, and often not very aware of her either.  When the lamb would wander off, Daisy didn’t care.  When the other sheep bullied the lamb, Daisy didn’t care.  When the dog wanted to give the lamb a good sniff and lick down, Daisy didn’t care.  She barely even seemed to notice.  These are all things that would definitely get a response from our other mother sheep.  They don’t let their lambs wander off for a few weeks.  They don’t let the dog even get a good sniff for several days.  And if the other sheep try to bully their lambs, they bully the sheep right back and protect them.  But Daisy doesn’t seem to care.

She wandered away from the lamb to investigate things and when the lamb called out for her she didn’t notice at first.  If the lamb kept calling, she would call back to the lamb, but she wouldn’t go to her.  But, when the lamb came to her to nurse, she let her.  Kind of an interesting situation.  She didn’t really reject her, but she isn’t very bonded either.  But we are glad we don’t need to bottle feed her.

We are keeping them in the jug as long as we can (Blue and Pansy are both imminently due to have their own babies and will need the jugs).  We are letting them out daily for barnyard play time.  But when they are out, we are being very watchful to be sure that everyone is safe and the lamb doesn’t get hurt, since Daisy is not protecting her.  We set up some panels to separate off a section of barnyard to put Autumn in when Nora is out because Autumn is bullying her very badly right now.  The other sheep and the goat have accepted her fine and are being nice.  We will see how it all plays out.  But we are very happy that both of them survived, and that Daisy didn’t fully reject her.

Throughout all of this we have been trying to find a name for this new little ewe lamb.  We have tried out several options, and finally landed on Nora. 

She is so adorable with her big, somewhat floppy ears.  She kind of looks like Piglet, from Winnie-the-Pooh because her ears are pink and shaped like Piglet’s and kind of flop over.  Plus the fact that her nose is pink.  And just her overall look and movements remind us all of Piglet.  But she is not at all like Piglet in personality.  She is super independent, curious, and brave – which is good since she doesn’t really have a Mom that will give her confidence and comfort her.

Welcome to the flock, Nora!