2021 Year-End Homestead Review

At the end of each year I like to do a homestead review post where I sum up the year and give some statistics about each area of the homestead.  It helps me see how we did, what we succeeded with, what we didn’t do as well as hoped with, etc.  Usually, it encourages me because I realize we accomplished a lot despite potentially feeling like we didn’t as I lived in the day-to-day chaos of life.

To read previous Year-End Reviews Click the following links:

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

This year is quite a bit different.  In January we started preparing our house to go on the market, and then the rest of the year was quite the whirlwind of selling, buying, moving, and settling at the new farm.  So there were pretty much no records kept about the homestead the way I usually do.  Plus, we did not have a garden, since we moved too late in the season to start it.  So this year’s update will be a little different.

Statistics

Chickens:

  • Started the year with 36 hens and 3 roosters.
  • Sold or butchered the flock down to 10 standard hens and 1 standard rooster, and 5 bantam hens for the move.
  • Put 7 store-bought chicks under broody hen to raise.
  • 1 bantam hen and 1 standard hen died.
  • Ended year with 16 standard hens, 1 standard rooster, and 4 bantam hens.
  • No idea how many eggs we got this year, but enough that we didn’t have to buy any and were able to sell some.

Ducks:

  • Started the year with 1 drake and 1 hen.  Both older.
  • Butchered older drake and hen before the move.
  • Purchased 10 Muscovy ducklings and 4 Welsh Harlequin ducklings to add to the new farm.
  • Butchered 2 Muscovy drakes and 2 Welsh Harlequin drakes.
  • Ended the year with 6 Muscovy hens, 2 Muscovy drakes, and 2 Welsh Harlequin hens.
  • Not sure how many eggs we got, but the Harlequins started laying in about November and laid about 10 eggs each week between the two of them.

Guinea Fowl:

  • Purchased 8 Guinea keets.
  • Had some issues getting them free-ranging but were able to get it figured out.  They roost in their coop overnight.
  • 1 was killed by one of the LGDs.
  • Ended year with 7 free-ranging Guinea Fowl.

Farm Dogs:

  • Anya, our 5.5-year-old Anatolian Shepherd continued to do well guarding the flock, even through the move to the new farm.  She has matured into an excellent LGD who loves her job and her flock.
  • Since the new farm had more space and created two flocks instead of just one, we added another LGD to the family.  Ayla is almost 2 years old and is learning and growing into a good guardian dog.  She is Anya’s half-sister.

Sheep:

  • Started year with 2 wool ewes,  2 dairy ewes, 1 dairy/wool ewe lamb, and 2 wool rams.
  • 1 ram lamb and 1 ewe lamb born, both survived.
  • An unknown (because we didn’t keep track), but good amount of milk produced for cheesemaking.
  •  4 fleece shorn from our wool sheep, for a total of  24 lbs raw, skirted wool.
  •  3 fleece shorn from our dairy sheep, for a total of  14 lbs raw, skirted wool.
  • We weren’t able to process many of the fleece due to how busy we were with the move, so we only processed one for a total of  600 yds of yarn.
  • Did not sell any sheep this year due to the expanded size of the new farm and our desire to expand the flocks.
  • Purchased 1 East Friesian (dairy) ram lamb, 1 BFL (wool) ram lamb, and 3 BFL (wool) ewe lambs.
  • Breeding season Oct-Dec: confirmed 2 pregnant dairy ewes, don’t have confirmation on the rest yet.
  • Finished year with 5 wool ewes, 1 wool wether, 2 wool rams, 4 dairy ewes, and 1 dairy ram.

Goats:

  • Started the year with 2 pregnant Nubian does.
  • One doe died
  • 1 buckling born, sold at weaning.
  • Purchased fresh (milking) Nubian doe.
  • Unknown amount of milk produced, but plenty for our family through the year.
  • Re-bred 2 does in Nov.
  • Ended year with 2 pregnant does due to kid in April.

Garden

  • No garden this year, but we were blessed with a lot of produce from other people’s gardens.
  • We did bring our container herb garden with us, and expanded it.  We harvested a lot of fresh herbs as well as harvesting and drying them.
  • Brought cuttings from our Lilac bushes with us and planted those.
  • Gifted an apple tree which we planted and it survived.
  • Purchased comfrey roots and planted several of those for next year.
  • Gifted some garlic and planted it for next year.
  • Started construction on the new vegetable garden for next year.

Heritage Arts:

  • There was a lot of knitting and sewing done, but I did not keep good track this year, so I have nothing to report here.

Kitchen:

  • Canned apples in honey syrup, applesauce, pickles, and crabapple jelly.
  • Root cellared garlic, onions, potatoes, pumpkins, and squash from a barter with someone.
  • Made quite a bit of aged cheese.  Mostly from sheep milk, a few from goat’s milk.
  • Made a lot of soft cheeses and dairy products, mostly from goat’s milk, some from sheep milk.

Year Summary

January was busy with house remodel projects to prepare it to go on the market.  I did some knitting and spinning, and we made firestarters to help keep the firemaking easy as we used them to warm our house.  We wethered our infertile BFL ram, and were excited to add a new breeding ram to the farm – an American Bond.  Unfortunately, he would later prove to be infertile as well.

February started with a hard loss – our sweet goat Pansy died after a long struggle with medical issues.  We had a deep freeze with days barely in the single digits and nights well into the negative numbers.  One of our dairy ewes, Daisy, gave birth to twins – a boy and a girl.  Her milk production was even better than last year (last year was her first freshening).  We decided to just let the lambs have it as we were up to our eyeballs with getting ready to sell the farm.  I did some knitting and decided to take a break from blogging as we were closing in on listing the homestead on the market.

I didn’t blog in March or early April.  But life kept marching on (of course).  Our house sold, with the stipulation that we find a suitable place to buy.  We looked and looked, but didn’t find anything during this time.  Our 5-year-old son had more liver issues, an ER visit which led to another hospitalization and his 24th surgery.  We continued to watch for our new farm.  The market was crazy with very little inventory, very high prices, and offers being placed and accepted in less than 24 hours.  It was easy for us as sellers, but hard as buyers.

In late April our Nubian doe delivered a buckling.  And we finished shearing all the sheep.  Just a few days before the contract on our previous house was going to expire, we found our new farm and our offer was accepted.  It was official – we were leaving the Rockies we had called home for many decades and heading to the High Plains.

In May we got really sick as we scrambled to pack and prepare to move a family of 7, plus grandma, a school, a business with large machinery, and a farm full of animals.  Thankfully, we were healthy in time for closing on both places and at the very end of May we signed all the papers and started the move.  Sadly, one week before the move, our sweet 15-year-old kitty, who we had owned since he was a kitten, passed away.  In hindsight, I am glad he didn’t have to go through the stress of the move at his old age, but we still miss him very much to this day.

June was crazy.  We spent two weeks prepping the new farm for us, the animals, and the machinery, then moving everything, and trying to somewhat settle in.  We saw our first tornado, way too clearly, on the third day we were here.  We added a new LGD to the farm family and she got right to work guarding one of the flocks (now that they were split into two at the new place with more space).  We started pasturing the sheep and goats and learning the ins and outs of intensive grazing with electric netting fence.  We started putting together a container garden with what we brought from our previous farm, plus some additional containers left on the new property.  Fencing the perimeter of the property with field fence to keep dogs out and sheep, goats, and dogs in became a priority, and big project, that wouldn’t fully get finished this year.  We also spent a ton of time weeding.  Weeding, weeding, and more weeding.  The area around the house that was covered in gravel was a jungle of weeds to the point you couldn’t see the gravel at all in some places.  We got a safe play area built for our youngest son.  Through it all, we were learning the new climate, the new views, the new landscape, the new wildlife….everything was new and different!  I continued to write online for Mother Earth News through the whole year, and I was really excited when I had my first article ever to make it into the print edition of the magazine printed in the June/July issue.

In July we thought we might just die of the heat.  We had more days in the triple digits than not, and several days got up to 108/109.  It was miserable for us as we had previously lived in the cool, high-altitude Rockies and had never experienced temperatures like that before, and certainly not day after day.  We continued to do what we could with the little container garden, but the temperatures were not helping.  Plus, pest bugs started killing everything we were working so hard to keep alive.  One of our sheep bloated, and we successfully tubed him and saved him since the vet couldn’t come.  We added ducklings, some chicks, and guinea keets to the farm.  By the end of the month the ducklings were out grazing in duck tractors we had built from odds and ends around the farm.  Milking the sheep and goat in the open with the flies and wind and heat was getting miserable, so we converted an old shed into a wonderful milking parlor.  Lastly, we built a door for the hay barn in preparation to put up hay for the year.

In August we started to feel somewhat settled at the new farm.  We added another Nubian milking doe and 4 Bluefaced Leicester sheep to the farm.  We did a lot of fermenting and canning.  Now that we had a couple of months under our belts, we were reading books like crazy and doing research to try to figure out how we want to manage and build the new farm in so many different areas – livestock, gardens, etc.  We started a new school year, our first and the new farm.  Sadly, our sweet, old house-rabbit, Wilbur, passed away.

September included a lot of illness and some death among the livestock, as well as illness among the humans.  We enjoyed a drop in the very hot temperatures and found we were able to spend more time outside.  I got my antique treadle sewing machine fixed and started to learn how to use it.  We built the poultry barn and moved around all the poultry to new housing.  We started to feel a bit overwhelmed as we tried to get to everything we needed to get done before winter hit.

October was full of guinea fowl adventures as we attempted to get our guineas to free-range but stay on our property and go indoors to roost at night.  I had another article published in the October/November print edition of Mother Earth News magazine.  Our youngest son had another round of liver issues with hospitalization and surgery.  I also spent a lot of time sewing on my antique treadle machine, making a quilt and aprons for gifts.  By the end of the month I felt completely proficient on the machine and it became my go-to sewing machine for most all my projects.

In November I was excited to be able to speak at the Homesteader’s Livestock Summit.  The whole family helped with my presentation and we all really enjoyed the opportunity to share what we love and teach about raising sheep for high-quality wool production.  The Nubian does headed to the breeder’s farm to get bred, since we don’t keep a buck for breeding.  Our sheep breeding season was proving challenging and we decided to try using ram harnesses with marking crayons to help figure out what was going on.  We finished all our “before winter hits” projects in time, including a root cellar/tornado shelter.  The girls had a very successful booth at a Christmas craft fair in the area.  And we got our first dusting of snow at the new farm.

December was shockingly warm, and we enjoyed it.  We also enjoyed the slower pace from a year of crazy busy.  We stopped all “projects” and just spent time enjoying our family.  We all got sick with a nasty cold, but it helped keep us slowed down, at home, and resting for the first time in a very long year.  The ducks started laying, and the goats came home pregnant.  We made our final plans for next year’s vegetable garden, and started working towards making it a reality.

It has been a crazy year of change and so much hard work.  But it is all a blessing and we are glad for the move and all that we have gone through.  We are looking forward to 2022 being our first full year at the new farm.  We are excited to see what every season is like here.  And we are busy dreaming and planning as we build this new homestead out on the High Plains.

Sunday Homestead Update – First Snow

Well, finishing up our winter prep last weekend was just in time…we got our first real snow this last week, and we got down to the teens one night. Brrrr.

It wasn’t a significant snow, just a dusting that melted off before lunchtime. But it was snow, and it was fun to see our first snow at the new farm. This was SO much later than we are used to getting snow. Our previous homestead, up in the Rockies has already had several snows this year and much colder weather. We have been enjoying the longer fall and warmer weather here, especially as we scurried to get projects done. The long-time locals tell us this has been unseasonably warm and that this is almost a record breaking late-in-the-season date for the first snow.

Holiday Craft Fair

About 6 weeks ago, Sunshine and Little Miss were invited to participate in a holiday craft fair. It was the first time this specific craft fair was going to take place so we were unsure about how well it would go. But they decided to take the plunge and see. They spent weeks working on making items for their table. Everything turned out beautifully, and they were very excited when the day finally arrived.

It went very well and they pretty much sold out of all they had made!

It also got us all into the holiday mood, so we are pretty excited to be celebrating Thanksgiving this week, and then decorating for Christmas this next coming weekend.

Livestock

I know this post didn’t include any homestead livestock or kitchen to speak of…I will update on all that next week.

Happy Thanksgiving!

Homestead Livestock Summit

As you know from following our blog, we are passionate about raising food from our land, whether it is vegetables, eggs, meat, or milk. We care about how our animals are treated and raised, and what goes into them and thus ends up in our food. We are also seeing so many shortages and rising prices that being more self-sustaining by raising our own food is important to providing well for our family. It feels so good to sit down to a meal around our table that has been completely raised on our property. We are also very passionate about raising our own wool, and then using that to create all sorts of items for our family from the high-quality fiber we are raising.

We love teaching and sharing all about how we do what we do, and helping others be successful in their homesteading pursuits. That is why we have this blog and why I enjoy writing for Mother Earth News and other publications about homesteading.

Soooo, I am very excited to tell you about this FREE 3-day event!

You can learn absolutely everything you’d ever want to know about the summit over here, but as a quick overview:

  • The summit will run from November 15 through November 17
  • Each day will be packed with amazing speakers who are ready to help you raise animals for food and make the most of your harvests
  • We’ve got a pop-up Facebook group where you’ll find accountability buddies, connect with other folks raising livestock, ask the speakers questions, and whatever else we come up with!
  • You can attend the summit absolutely free, but you can choose to grab the All Access Pass at any time. The All Access Pass will give you an all-access pass to the summit (meaning you get all the videos for life), and exclusive speaker bonuses including mentorships, digital guides, and more! ***The All Access Pass is currently being offered at a special price, and it will disappear for good once the summit is over, so start thinking about now!

I am honored to be included as one of the expert speakers, and I will be speaking about raising sheep for high-quality wool on Tuesday afternoon, November 16th.

Head over to the website to learn more and grab your free ticket. More information will be sent straight to your inbox afterwards.

I will be ready to chat and answer your questions during my presentation…hope to see you there!

Sunday Homestead Update – Use What You Have

Another scorcher of a week at the new property. But I think we are all beginning to acclimate and we still got a lot done.

Use What You Have

We have long wanted to be able to use a poultry tractor to graze our poultry, but it was unrealistic at our previous farm. The new farm is the perfect place to graze our poultry, and so building our first tractor was high on the priority list this summer. We ended up with an opportunity to get some ducks last week and jumped on it, so this week we got to work getting the tractor built.

There are so many designs for tractors (or any livestock housing for that matter). Our favorite way to do these things is to go online and look in books for all different ideas, tuck those in our heads, and then walk around the property looking at what we have as far as leftover supplies and “junk.” Then we build what we can with what we have.

That is exactly how we went about building this duck tractor. Steel scraps from the re-roofing of the house a couple years ago, PVC pipe, a roll of chicken wire, some plywood from a previous project, and leftover wheels from a wagon……we bought a few supplies to be able to make what we wanted, the rest were things we had around the farm.

The wheels are removeable so the tractor sits on the ground when not being moved.

Then we put electric chicken netting fence around the tractor to keep predators away at night. We can move the tractor twice before we have to move the fence, and we are finding it all goes quite quick and easy.

This is housing just to be used during the warm weather when we want them grazing and foraging. We will be building permanent housing to be used for winter. For now, the 4 Welsh Harlequins are in the tractor, since they are a bit older and have feathers. The Muscovy’s are still in the brooder until they get more feathers. We are working the tractor around the area we hope to make into the veggie garden for next year. They are grazing on the weeds and grass and eating the bugs, plus adding in their fertilizer. We have LONG wanted to try this out, so this is fun and exciting to see in action. Another tractor is already in the works to hold the Muscovy’s when they are ready, and to use for chickens in the future too.

Chickens

Our 8-year-old, excellent, broody mama-hen, Eve, wanted to set eggs again. This time, instead of giving her our fertile eggs, we gave her fake eggs and then purchased some chicks and put them under her after a couple of weeks. She accepted them beautifully, and now we have 8 chicks being raised by her.

Sheep and Goats

Seeing the sheep and goat on pasture just makes me smile. It is so satisfying. We always wanted to pasture our livestock, but it was not possible at our last farm. So it is a dream a long time coming to watch them eat their way around the property. The electric net fencing is working great. We move it every 4 days or so. They are getting “free” nutrition, and they are improving the soil in the pastures as they go. Win-win.

Heritage Arts

Summer generally is not a big heritage arts time for our family because we are outside so much. But with this super-hot weather, I am finding myself stuck inside more and thus have gotten back into my knitting and crochet projects. I finished the Shimmering Nights Poncho this week and I am very happy with it.

I used the yarn that Daniel made from Freya’s fleece. It is a 2-ply sport weight, and 100% Wensleydale wool. I love how Freya’s yarn keeps the same character that her beautiful locks have when they are on her. It is very drape-y and still looks a little curly.

It felt good to complete a project that has been in the works for awhile due to being set aside during the move.

Garden

Up in the high Rockies we did not deal with many garden pests. The High Plains is a completely different story. We have immense amounts of bugs all wanting to eat our garden. We used some hoop covers to protect some of our container garden, but this week we found that bugs killed our Red Kuri squash.

We found them on the Golden Nugget squash and the cucumber too. So we have covered all of them and are picking the bugs off twice a day in hopes that we can keep it under control and not have them die. We have also left the Red Kuri squash for now, in hopes it might be able to pull through and survive. Time will tell. But finding the bugs on the outside of the tents and finding less and less inside each day is promising. So hopefully the cucumber and Golden Nugget will make it, even if it is too late for the Red Kuri.

All this experience is keeping our minds going as we think and plan for our big veggie garden build for next spring. We are learning what it will take to be successful here, which is good so that we can really plan the garden more carefully and not have to make as many changes later. I am so glad we did some amount of gardening this year, despite the move, so we could see and experience what it is like while we plan the big garden. With the amount of bad bugs we are dealing with, I expect our garden will include a lot of pest control tents, which will also help with the bad hail storms we get out here. But managing them with the wind will be tricky.

The never-ending puzzle and adventure of homesteading! We love it!

Sunday Homestead Update – Time for a Break

This will be my last post for a while.  We have a lot of things going on in our life right now, and I am finding that I need a break from blogging for a bit.  So I am hitting the pause button.  But don’t worry…I will be back soon, and I will have a lot to share as we enjoy spring on the farm.  Before I go, one final Sunday Homestead Update catching you up on each aspect of the winter homestead…

Sheep

Daisy and her lambs, Dusty and Dixie, are doing well.  She is producing LOADS of milk.  Much more than last year – which was her first freshening.  We have decided to just let her lambs have it all for the first 3 weeks or so before we start milking her.  But I am looking forward to seeing how her production compares to last year.  The lambs are so active that it is difficult to get photos in the little jug.  It has been too cold to let them out yet, but this week is supposed to be beautifully warm, so they are going to see the outside world for the first time tomorrow.

Freya either did not get pregnant, or she miscarried during the wildfire evacuations.  So there will be no lambs from her at this point.  We can hope that maybe she was bred by Nilsson in December or January and is due this summer.  Time will tell.  But for now, there are no more lambs due for our farm until the end of May.

Several sheep are desperately in need of shearing.  We have had some crazy busy-ness going on, not to mention bitter cold temps that make us not want to shear.  We will be shearing several of them within the next few weeks as it warms up.

Goats

Belle is continuing to do very well with the loss of Pansy.  She seems to be fitting in fine with the sheep and is kind of making friends with the wether, MacDougal.  Not to mention the bond she has always had with Anya, the LGD.

We are drying Belle off (gradually ceasing to milk her and stop her milk production) this week in preparation for her kidding coming in April.

Chickens

The chickens have done an excellent job of laying through this cold winter, especially considering the stress the wildfire evacuation put on them back in October/November.  All is well with them and there is not much to report.

Ducks

Our first winter with ducks has gone better than expected.  We had planned to just give them a chicken waterer and no pond throughout the winter.  But we have found that with a trough heater in the bottom of their pool, it stays thawed and they really enjoy swimming in it and they don’t seem negatively effected by the cold.  We do not let them have it when the temperature is below about 15F.

Heritage Arts

I am about halfway down the length of the sweater I am making for Mtn Man.  He tried it on and it looks like it will fit great.  I am very excited and hope to get this done before it is too warm for him to wear it this winter season.

I finished the first side of my summer poncho.  I started the second side, but I am trying to work less on this as it can wait to be worn until summer, and focus more on Mtn Man’s sweater.

Sunshine recently took a colorwork knitting class and learned the basics of colorwork through making this hat.  There were many ups and downs for her, as it is pretty difficult to learn the right tension for colorwork.  But I think the hat looks amazing!

Hazel and Jerry

I can’t leave, even for a short break, without giving you all some pics of Hazel and Jerry.  Every day they are cuddled together in a new, cute position.  Love these two!