Sunday Homestead Update

Bears, Coyotes, and Golden Eagles…Still!

The wildlife around here is causing us some issues lately.  The bear continues to visit nightly, thankfully it hasn’t gotten into my garden again.  But it has been prowling the barn, which makes the LGD bark like crazy, which gets us up and out of bed to investigate, which has meant a lack of sleep.  In addition, the coyote family that is denning 200 yds from our barn has been on the property yipping and yapping and making a lot of noise each night for over a week now.  Again…lack of sleep.  Add to that the fact that Mr. Smiles has been struggling with his medical issues and thus waking a lot during the night and you have two very tired adults on this little farm.

The eagles still haven’t moved on.  So we continue with only letting the chickens out when a human can be there to guard them.  I am not sure what we will do if they don’t move along soon.  I read that they can have a home range of 70 square miles.  Why are they hanging out here?  They have not had a (fully) successful meal in our barnyard, so I wish they would move on.

Garden

We have done a lot of harvesting this week.  Peas, beets, carrots, cabbage, kitchen herbs, medicinal herbs, and wild foraging of herbs as well.  I am always amazed at the colors and scents of fresh-picked produce.  The camera doesn’t do justice to it, like in the below photo, the rich, bright orange color is not captured as it is by my eyes.  I love looking at the beautiful color of fresh-picked carrots.

It has been fun to be bringing in so much food and either eating it, or putting it up for winter use.

There are all kinds of herbs hanging and drying all over the house, like the yarrow above.  I love hvaing hanging herbs “decorating” the house!

Chickens

The hen who was attacked by the Eagle, Carrot, is healing up and improving each day.  I am really excited that she has survived, I really didn’t think she would.  She is also becoming quite friendly and very talkative with us since she is in the barn and gets extra attention.

Our broody silkie, Eve, has decided to set again.  She is our most successful broody hen and has set many many clutches for us over the 6 years she has been here.

So we moved her to the broody coop and later today will give her 7 eggs (she is on wooden ones while we finish collecting enough).  I will also put some eggs in the incubator to make up for any fertility problem we might have since our new young cockerel, Boaz, is the one breeding the flock right now and we don’t know how successful he is.  I will candle later this week and move over the fertiles to Eve.

Then our other broody silkie, Lily, decided to set as well.  She is not as experienced nor as reliable.  But we have moved her to the grow pen and given her some wooden eggs.  If she settles then we will give her real ones too.

Trees, Firewood, Lumber

Winter will be here before we know it (hard to believe, but true).  It is time for us to start working towards putting up all the firewood we need to heat the house this winter.  We were asked to take down a couple of huge, dead, beetle-kill, Ponderosa pine trees on someone’s property in exchange for the wood.  So yesterday we got the two ginormous trees down safely (PtL!) and did load after load after load of hauling slash and firewood rounds back to our property.  We also cut the largest parts of the trunks into 8-foot lengths and will haul them to the lumber mill to make some lumber for projects we would like to do around the property this fall.  It was a long, hard day, but we are a lot closer to being able to build our projects, and have firewood for the winter as well.  We will need to take down some more trees to have enough firewood for the winter since most of these two is going for lumber, but we have several other dead, beetle-kill trees that people want us to take down.  So we will continue to work on procuring our firewood on and off through the fall.

Sunday Homestead Update

We have had some different things going on around here this week.  Not your run-of-the-mill SHU.  Except for these strawberries, from the strawberry patch.  🙂

Natural Weed Control

We have some driveway and stair areas that  have all sorts of grasses and weeds growing in them that we would like to keep clear.  We do not want to use herbicides on our property that could potentially be harmful to our animals and our edible plants.  Mtn Man told me about a recipe for weed spray that uses vinegar, dish soap, and salt.  So we bought a pump sprayer and I gave it a try.  It is working beautifully.  It has taken a couple applications, but we are definitely seeing results.

Wild Foraging

We enjoy learning about the edible wild plants that grow on our property so we spend a lot of time through the summer and fall with our favorite edible wild plants book, “Best-Tasting Wild Plants of Colorado and the Rockies,” by Cattail Bob Seebck, in our hands wandering the property and examining the plants we find.  Little Miss is especially interested in this aspect of our homestead.

Last week she and Mountain Man worked their way around the property and gathered us a salad for our dinner that was completely wild foraged.  It included Lamb’s Quarter, Saltbrush (my favorite), Tumble Mustard, Tansy Mustard, Mallow, and Squaw Paint.  They also found a bunch of chamomile that we are drying for tea this winter.  It was a very flavorful and delicious salad.

Wild Visitors

We found this little guy on our rock wall one day.

He was about 2.5 inches long.  The kids are now talking about building a bat house to encourage them to “hang” around our property since they eat bugs.

We have a family of coyotes denning about 200 yards from our barnyard.  Mama coyote picked that as a good place to raise a family.  We hear them multiple times each day and night as they yip and yap to each other.  Thankfully, a well-built fence and Anya, the LGD, make it so it doesn’t have to be a concern to us for our livestock.  Whenever they get to yipping Anya likes to throw in her deep throated bark and remind them she is big and she is still here and still on guard.  Thankfully, they have not chosen to come by the barnyard, nor hang out around it the way we sometimes have coyotes do.

Heritage Arts

I haven’t had much time to knit lately, but I have made some progress on my Nightshift shawl.

Guess what made its way into the living room and got dusted off and put to use!?  My spinning wheel!  I haven’t spun since our almost 4-year-old was born.  Life has been so full with his medical stuff, plus just regular busy life, that there just wasn’t time for it.  But this week I got it out and started spinning.  I love spinning, it is super therapeutic for me and emotionally recharging.  It calms me and resets me.  But it is hard on my back, so I have to take it easy and not overdo.  It was really great to spend some time spinning again, and I am hoping to get back into doing it regularly.

Another heritage art that we have not done in awhile that came back this week was wool rug braiding.  Little Miss is braiding a rug for my parents.  She was working on her braid and laying it out on one of our old rugs to decide when to change colors.  it is coming along nicely.

Cheese Making

It was a week of bringing back some old homestead activities, for sure.  We haven’t made cheese in 4-5 years, and this week Little Miss and I decided to make some cheese with Pansy’s milk.  We made a goat’s milk Paneer.

It turned out well.  We used the cheese press Mtn Man built for me several years ago when we got our first dairy cow.

Next week we plan to make Feta.

Chicken Butchering

We had saved two of the Dark Brahma cockerels to raise up one of them for a breeding rooster.  We were waiting for them to get a bit older so we could pick the best one.  They started fighting this week, so it was time to choose.  Braveheart has helped with butchering many many times, and watched Mtn Man do the killing as well, but this time he decided he wanted to do the whole process all by himself.  So he killed and butchered the cockerel all on his own for the first time ever!  We were all very happy for his accomplishment, and I am sure the meat will taste all the more delicious to him knowing he did all the work himself.

Hot City

I had to go into the big city this week (Denver) and got stuck in bad traffic.  it was 101F outside, but because of all the idling cars crammed together and inching along the hot pavement, this is what my car said it was outside:

Eeeek!  Needless to say I was oh-so-happy to get out of the hot city and back up onto the homestead in the mountains.

Foraging

July is the time of year for collecting wild medicinal herbs on our property up here in the mountains.  The past couple of weeks the kids and I have been doing just that.

The plants that grow naturally here that we collect are mullein, dandelion leaf, red clover, yarrow, and plantain.  We wait until the dew has dried in the morning, but before the major heat of the day hits.  We are careful to only take what we need (or less) and leave plenty so it will keep coming up year after year.  After we gather the herbs we hang them to dry.

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Then, we crush them up and store them in jars in a cool, dark cabinet.

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It feels great to know we have the dried herbs we need to get through another winter!