Sunday Homestead Update

Fall is closing in on us quickly here in the mountains.  The evening air the last few nights has had quite a chill on it.  The elk are looking handsome in their velvet antlers.  We have already heard a few of them bugling, which signals the beginning of their breeding season, and hunting season starts soon as well so we will be working to secure our red meat for the year and get it all processed and into the freezer.

Butterflies

A few weeks ago we found these Black Swallowtail Butterfly caterpillars on our garden dill.

We put them in a container and fed them more dill.  A few days later they went into their chrysalis.

Only 12 days later, they emerged as butterflies.

So amazing.

Chickens

The mama Golden Eagle has moved on.  She is done raising her two fledglings, it is time for them to make it on their own.  And they currently want to continue making it on their own at our property.  Sigh.  The chickens have been closed in for three weeks now and it is just too long.  The amount of chickens we keep is based on the fact that they spend all day free ranging in the barnyard.  Their enclosed exterior pen is big enough for them short-term, but I feel like it is overcrowded when they are living in there for weeks.  Plus, the cost of feed when they are not free-ranging is through the roof.  So, if we plan to keep them closed in we need to decrease our numbers.  But we don’t want to plan to keep them in – we like our free-ranging, compost turning, happy, healthy, helpful chickens.

So we are doing an experiment.  The Eagle killed the chicken while Anya was napping in the barn cool and shade of the afternoon.  But there is plenty of shade in the barnyard, albeit maybe not as cool as the barn with the breeze blowing through.  So we are letting the chickens free-range with Anya guarding them, and we have closed the barn so that she can’t go in there.  If it rains we open up the barn of course to let them in out of the weather.  We started this plan on Tuesday, so we have now made it 5 days with no loss.  We are hopeful this is an answer to our dilemma until the eagles finally move on.

Last week we gave Eve 6 eggs to set and we put 6 in the incubator to make up for any infertility troubles since our young un-proven cockerel is the one breeding right now.  Well, every single egg was infertile.  Sigh.  We have seen him breeding young pullets, but all the eggs I put for hatch were from the adult hens.  So apparently he has not started breeding the adult hens yet.  So we grabbed 6 young pullet eggs and put them under Eve and 6 more to put in the incubator.  Hopefully, there will be some good fertility with these.  If not, then Eve will not be setting eggs at this point and will have to go back to the lower coop.

Garden

We have been harvesting a lot from the garden and either eating it or putting it up for winter.

The first batch of sauerkraut from our cabbages is done and in jars in the refrigerator.  We have more cabbages ready to harvest is will probably start another load this week.  We have been harvesting, cleaning, chopping, portioning, and freezing celery, peas, and carrots.  The purple beans harvest has now started too and we will be canning those.  The garlic is out and curing.

And we have had two gooseberry pies this week.  Yumm!

Sheep

Three of the sheep have been sold and are leaving the farm this week.  Rose, the moorit ewe, and the ram lambs, Tornado and Avalanche.  They will be used as breeding stock on another farm.

Rose

Tornado

Avalanche

We will still have Fiona and Fergus.

Fiona

Fergus

We haven’t decided yet what to do with Stormy, the ewe lamb.  She was going to be sold but it fell through.  We will likely try to sell her, but might decide to keep her.

Stormy

Though we are sad to see them go, this will open up an opportunity that we have been dreaming about for a few years now…the chance to raise dairy sheep!  In September we will be bringing in some dairy sheep to add to the flock, breed, and raise here at Willow Creek Farm.  We are all very excited about this new project.  We have wanted to have dairy sheep since 2014 when we milked one of our wool sheep because her lamb had died.  We loved the sheep milk and have wanted to do this project ever since.  Now we have our chance!  I am looking forward to introducing them to you next month.

4 thoughts on “Sunday Homestead Update

  1. Is refrigeration of sauerkraut better than just leaving it in a barrel or crock? I can ours because there is so much at the same time. Of course, it is not as good canned. It tastes fine, but is ‘cooked’. If it goes with a roast, it gets cooked twice.

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      • Cooking also ruins the texture. I only can it to make it last longer. I lack refrigeration. (There is a refrigerator here, but it can not hold several gallons of sauerkraut.) If I grew cabbage through a longer season, it would be nice to make smaller batches of sauerkraut through the year, and not can them. Sauerkraut is easier to can than plain cabbage because it does not need to be pressure canned. I do not know what is worse; making sauerkraut and then ruining the nutritional value (and texture) by canning, or ruining the nutritional value (in another way) by canning cabbage with very high temperature. Really, the best option is to grow it over a long season, and can as little as possible.

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