Sunday Homestead Update

Bears, Coyotes, and Golden Eagles…Still!

The wildlife around here is causing us some issues lately.  The bear continues to visit nightly, thankfully it hasn’t gotten into my garden again.  But it has been prowling the barn, which makes the LGD bark like crazy, which gets us up and out of bed to investigate, which has meant a lack of sleep.  In addition, the coyote family that is denning 200 yds from our barn has been on the property yipping and yapping and making a lot of noise each night for over a week now.  Again…lack of sleep.  Add to that the fact that Mr. Smiles has been struggling with his medical issues and thus waking a lot during the night and you have two very tired adults on this little farm.

The eagles still haven’t moved on.  So we continue with only letting the chickens out when a human can be there to guard them.  I am not sure what we will do if they don’t move along soon.  I read that they can have a home range of 70 square miles.  Why are they hanging out here?  They have not had a (fully) successful meal in our barnyard, so I wish they would move on.

Garden

We have done a lot of harvesting this week.  Peas, beets, carrots, cabbage, kitchen herbs, medicinal herbs, and wild foraging of herbs as well.  I am always amazed at the colors and scents of fresh-picked produce.  The camera doesn’t do justice to it, like in the below photo, the rich, bright orange color is not captured as it is by my eyes.  I love looking at the beautiful color of fresh-picked carrots.

It has been fun to be bringing in so much food and either eating it, or putting it up for winter use.

There are all kinds of herbs hanging and drying all over the house, like the yarrow above.  I love hvaing hanging herbs “decorating” the house!

Chickens

The hen who was attacked by the Eagle, Carrot, is healing up and improving each day.  I am really excited that she has survived, I really didn’t think she would.  She is also becoming quite friendly and very talkative with us since she is in the barn and gets extra attention.

Our broody silkie, Eve, has decided to set again.  She is our most successful broody hen and has set many many clutches for us over the 6 years she has been here.

So we moved her to the broody coop and later today will give her 7 eggs (she is on wooden ones while we finish collecting enough).  I will also put some eggs in the incubator to make up for any fertility problem we might have since our new young cockerel, Boaz, is the one breeding the flock right now and we don’t know how successful he is.  I will candle later this week and move over the fertiles to Eve.

Then our other broody silkie, Lily, decided to set as well.  She is not as experienced nor as reliable.  But we have moved her to the grow pen and given her some wooden eggs.  If she settles then we will give her real ones too.

Trees, Firewood, Lumber

Winter will be here before we know it (hard to believe, but true).  It is time for us to start working towards putting up all the firewood we need to heat the house this winter.  We were asked to take down a couple of huge, dead, beetle-kill, Ponderosa pine trees on someone’s property in exchange for the wood.  So yesterday we got the two ginormous trees down safely (PtL!) and did load after load after load of hauling slash and firewood rounds back to our property.  We also cut the largest parts of the trunks into 8-foot lengths and will haul them to the lumber mill to make some lumber for projects we would like to do around the property this fall.  It was a long, hard day, but we are a lot closer to being able to build our projects, and have firewood for the winter as well.  We will need to take down some more trees to have enough firewood for the winter since most of these two is going for lumber, but we have several other dead, beetle-kill trees that people want us to take down.  So we will continue to work on procuring our firewood on and off through the fall.

3 thoughts on “Sunday Homestead Update

  1. Removing ponderosa pines is a never ending task here. So many die. The area has not burned in a very long time, so many of the pines are geriatric. Sadly, almost all of the wood is chipped and blasted back out into the forest. There is just too much of it. Because there is so much redwood for lumber, we do not use much pine at all unless some is needed to repair or restore something in an old building that is already outfitted with pine. Oak and madrone are used for firewood, and there is even too much of that. Fires in fireplaces are rare. The climate is mild. Environmentalists dislike smoke. When fireplaces are damaged by earthquakes, they are more likely to be removed than repaired.

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