Finished Smokehouse Built from Pallet Wood

We were very excited to be able to build our smokehouse for only $27 by using hardwood pallets and other re-purposed materials.  Thankfully, we get a lot of leftover and used materials and items from Mtn Man’s work in construction.  It is amazing what people throw out that is still useful.  One man’s trash is another man’s treasure.  Much of our homestead has been build for very little money because of this exact concept.

Living on a mountainside came in handy for this project because our driveway had to be cut out of the mountain, leaving us a perfect place to be able to set up the wood stove lower than the smokehouse.

We started by digging out an area for the stove to sit, as well as a ditch for the stovepipe to run from the stove into the smokehouse.  The distance from where the stovepipe hooked into the stove to where it came up into the smokehouse was 10 feet because that should allow us to do either hot smoking or cold smoking.

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The stove we used was laying out behind my in-laws house rusting, not having been used for years.  Besides the missing front window in one of the doors and some broken legs it was in working order.  We removed all the legs and eventually covered the window hole with some scrap metal.

We got the wood stove into position and then hooked up the stovepipe.  We made sure it had support underneath it all along the ditch.  Parts of the stovepipe were purchased, and other parts were left-over or re-used.

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Once everything was secure and where we wanted it we back-filled in over the pipe and stove.

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Now that we had the source of smoke ready, it was time to build the smokehouse itself.  We used  16 hard-wood pallets for the framing, to make board and batten siding, and for the door.  There were some miscellaneous pieces left-over from the pallets as well.

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View inside of the smokehouse

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We used the thicker pieces of pallet wood for the rafters and a left-over piece of metal roofing as the roof.

 

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Mtn Man also bent some leftover gutter coil for the metal drip edge.

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The main cost for the project was the box of screws we purchased for assembling the smokehouse.  The hinges for the door were ones we already had.  We also put screws in the roof rafters to use as hooks for hanging the meat.

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Screws in rafters for hanging meat

And we love using antlers from Mtn Man and Young Man’s hunting for handles.

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Then Mtn Man made some stairs with a leftover pressure treated 8×8 so we can easily get up and down from the smokehouse.

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We are so happy with how it turned out and can’t wait to try it out!  We will let you know how it goes.

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4 thoughts on “Finished Smokehouse Built from Pallet Wood

  1. Wow – for the cost of a box of screws? You guys are very thrifty and handy, indeed! It looks great and I will be interested in seeing how your first smoking turns out.

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  2. Hello,
    I’m just wondering if there is any concern over whether the wood from pallets was chemically treated? Will the food come in contact with the pallets, if so did you think about what they were initially used for? Thank you, Lisa

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    • What excellent questions. I should have included that information in my post.
      Mtn Man had noticed that the pallets used to ship Benjamin Moore paint to our area were all really clean looking. So he contacted them and found that they do not treat their pallets in any way, they are just raw hard woods. And they only get used for shipping once so they were brand new. So he picked only from those pallets and picked only clean ones that didn’t have any spills on them.
      Also, once the smokehouse was built, we have heated it 195F three times without meat in it with the hopes of off-gasing anything we might have missed and drying it all out.
      The meat does not touch the wood at all. It dangles, hung from the ceiling.
      I dont think it would be wise to build it from old, treated, or dirty pallets.

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